The forgotten greatness of Juan Pablo Sorin – skilfully versatile, eccentric and so stereotypically Argentinian

By Gerra Deegan 

Perhaps one Friday afternoon, a decade from now, when you’re sitting in your office bored and wishfully counting down the clock on your computer screen until it’s time to go home for the weekend, you decide to take one of the many thousands of quizzes on Sporcle. The question reads: ‘Name the South American Player who played for these clubs; Lazio, Paris Saint-Germain, Barcelona, River Plate, and Juventus?’

Continue reading “The forgotten greatness of Juan Pablo Sorin – skilfully versatile, eccentric and so stereotypically Argentinian”

Why are two-footed players so rare and does it really matter?

By Andrew Misra

Sports psychology aside, football is a game predominantly played with your feet. Cheers, Geoff. But really, most of the time it’s predominantly played with one foot. Go to the nearest recreational football ground at the weekend and this will become abundantly clear not just visually, but verbally too.

The right-back tracking the tricky opposition left winger will routinely be told to “show them onto their right”. Continue reading “Why are two-footed players so rare and does it really matter?”

Advent Day 10 – Juan Román Riquelme, the player who pauses

By Joe Davies

Number 10. Football’s most iconic shirt number has been synonymous with teams’ creative attackers all over the world. Brazil have had Pelé, Ronaldinho and Rivaldo. Italy had Roberto Baggio, Francesco Totti and Alessandro Del Piero. Even England have had Geoff Hurst, Michael Owen and Wayne Rooney. However, nowhere is the number more crucial to a team’s identity than in Argentina. Arguably the two greatest players to have ever played the game, Diego Maradona and Lionel Messi, have donned the number for La Albiceleste, but few have embodied the essence of the shirt and its implied role more than Juan Román Riquelme.

Continue reading “Advent Day 10 – Juan Román Riquelme, the player who pauses”